Can 10 days make a difference in my health?

YES

Researchers at UCSF and Touro University restricted added sugar in the diet of children with obesity and at least one other co-morbidity for a mere 10 days and nearly every indicator of metabolic health improved significantly. 

10 DAYS CAN MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE

TAKE THE 10 DAY CHALLENGE


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  • commented 2015-11-13 12:32:32 -0800
    Thank you Wolfram - that’s very helpful. It explains a “gut reaction” I’ve had to the taste of some foods. Most things these days are sweet in an unbalanced way - e.g. canned tomato sauces - ugh way to sweet! And those organic snack bars from Costco. I wan’t really knowledgable about fiber-reduced foods converting to sugar as soon as eaten - very good to know. I’m going to make an effort to eat much
    more fiber
  • commented 2015-11-13 10:54:44 -0800
    USDA Organic has a lot of integrity as far as the environmental impact, and certainly, eating food with less trace chemicals is better for human health. Unfortunately, the organic food industry is loading up many food products with sugar. When it comes to sugar, the impact on the metabolic system is the same - whether or not the source of sugar is organic. So, read labels carefully when buying organic to be sure sugar levels are not excessive. Organic foods are also not immune to ultra processing, and the nutritional impact of these foods are greatly diminished. Processing of organic grains and other whole foods high in starch often means that the value of the fiber is destroyed and that these substances will convert to sugar (glucose) almost instantly once consumed. “Clean” must be considered not only in terms of additives - but also processes. Ultra-processing of foods destroys nutritional values, and converts healthy ingredients into unhealthy constituents.
  • commented 2015-11-07 10:47:25 -0800
    I have a question about the label “organic.” How clean is it? Specifically, I’ve noticed that Costco suddenly has all sorts of organic snack foods, and the ingredients list looks not too awful, but is this too good to be true? Also how “clean” is honey - it’s my sweetener for oatmeal? What about Lindt chocolate? I like that! Otherwise I think I already eat “clean.”
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